Nadiya Kravets

Nadiya
Kravets

Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute

Visitor,
Visiting Scholar

Nadiya V. Kravets received her PhD (DPhil) at the University of Oxford (Department of Politics and International Relations, St. Antony’s College) in 2012. Her dissertation dealt with the domestic sources of Ukraine’s foreign and security policy since independence and was funded by the IREX Title VIII program and the Open Society Foundation. She completed her B.A. in International Relations at San Francisco State University in 2005, followed by an MPhil in Russian and East European Studies at the University of Oxford. During 2011-2012 she was the Eugene and Daymel Shklar Research Fellow at the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute and the following year held a Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard University, where she began to work on her second book project on "Managing Post-Imperial Moscow: Examining Policies of Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, and Ukraine toward Russia, 1991–2014". Currently Dr. Kravets is the GIS Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute and a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies.

Expertise
Ukraine’s foreign and security policy; Soviet and post-Soviet Russian foreign policy; foreign policy of the European Union; relations between former Soviet republics; and energy politics in the former Soviet Union.
Current Project
"Managing Post-Imperial Moscow: Examining Policies of Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, and Ukraine toward Russia, 1991–2012"
Foreign Language

Education

D.Phil.
, Politics and International Relations
, Oxford University
Selected Publications

"Integration without Accession: The EU’s Special Relationship with the Countries in Its Neighborhood," contributor, Report to the European Parliament (October 2007).

"European Union and United States Relations: Cooperation, Competition, or Both?" International Relations Journal (San Francisco State University, Spring 2004): 65–76.