The ‘Least Mapped Place in the World’ Wins Davis Center GIS Prize

Anya Domlesky, a candidate for the degree of master in landscape architecture at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, presents her project, “The ‘Least Mapped Place in the World’: Urban Present and Projection in an Arctic Watershed,” during the poster session of the Annual Conference of the Center for Geographic Analysis, Harvard University, on May 3, 2013. Photo: S. Failla.

Friday, May 3, 2013

Anya Domlesky and Martin Pavlinic have won the Davis Center’s second GIS Prize for Excellence in Russian, East European, and Central Asian Studies, presented May 3, 2013, at the Annual Conference of the Center for Geographic Analysis, Harvard University. Their project, “The ‘Least Mapped Place in the World’: Urban Present and Projection in an Arctic Watershed,” investigates how rapid climate change is transforming the societies and economies of the resource-rich Russian North.

Both Domlesky and Pavlinic are candidates for the degree of master in landscape architecture at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. Work on their project was begun in the course "Theories of Landscape as Urbanization, Landscape as Infrastructure," taught by Professor Pierre Bélanger in fall 2012.

The prize selection committee said of the winning entry: “This geospatial essay tells a convincing story of predicted urbanization, incorporating scientific knowledge, theories of urban development, and several scales of geographic representation, all presented in an elegant visual format.”