Irina Busygina

Irina
Busygina

Professor, Higher School of Economics (HSE), St. Petersburg; Director, Center for Comparative Governance Studies, HSE, St. Petersburg

Visiting Scholar

Irina Busygina is Professor in the Department of Political Science, Higher School of Economics in St. Petersburg. Her research interests include Russia-EU relations, Russian politics, Russian foreign policy, comparative federalism and regionalism. Her recent books include Political Modernization of the State in Russia: Necessity, Directions, Costs and Risks, Moscow: “Liberal Mission” Foundation (2012, co-author Mikhail Filippov), and Russia-EU Relations and the Common Neighborhood; Coercion vs. Authority, UK and New York: Routledge (2018). She is a member of PONARS Eurasia group and has published in “Europe-Asia Studies”, “Problems of Post-Communism”, “Journal of Eurasian Studies”, “Russian Politics” and other academic journals.

Expertise
Russian foreign policy
Russia-European Union
post-Soviet space
comparative federalism
Current Project
Trade-offs and inconsistencies of the Russian foreign policy: the case of Eurasia
Foreign Language

Education

PhD
, Political Science
, Moscow State Institute of International Affairs (MGIMO)
Selected Publications

Russia, the Council of Europe, and “Ruxit,” or Why Non-Democratic Illiberal Regimes Join International Organizations, Problems of Post-Communism, Vol.66, N5, 2019. Published online: 30 Sep 2019 (with Jeffrey Kahn), https://doi.org/10.1080/10758216.2019.1660186

Russia in the Eurasian Economic Union: Lack of Trust in Russia Limits the Possible. PONARS Eurasia Policy Memo N571, February 2019.

Are post-Soviet leaders doomed to be populist? A comparative analysis of Putin and Nazarbayev, European Politics and Society (published online 18 Jan 2019)

The Low Quality of National Governance and Unevenness in the Economic Competitiveness of Regions: The Case of Russia, Russian Politics, 3 (2018), pp.196-215 (with Mikhail Filippov)

To decentralize or to continue on the centralization track: The cases of authoritarian regimes in Russia and Kazakhstan, Journal of Eurasian Studies, N 9, 2018, pp.61-71.

Period