The 1989 Velvet Revolution in Czechoslovakia, 30 Years Later: The Event, Its Consequences, and Its Legacy

Monday, November 18, 2019 - 2:00pm to 5:45pm
Czech flag waving over avenue of protestors

CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street, Room S153

PANEL 1: THE VELVET REVOLUTION OF 1989 | 2:00-3:45 PM
Jonathan Bolton, Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University; Faculty Associate, Davis Center
Michael Kraus, Frederick C. Dirks Professor of Political Science, Middlebury College
Mark Kramer, Program Director, Cold War Studies Program, Davis Center

Moderated by Nadia Boyadjieva, Professor of International Law and International Relations, Institute for Balkan Studies, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences; Center Associate, Davis Center


COFFEE BREAK |
3:45-4:00 PM

PANEL 2: THE CONSEQUENCES AND LEGACY OF THE VELVET REVOLUTION | 4:00-5:45 PM
Kieran Williams, Visiting Professor, Department of Political Science, Drake University
Allison Stanger, Russell Leng '60 Prof of Intl Politics & Economics, Middlebury College
Jacques Rupnik, Senior Research Fellow, Center for International Studies, Sciences Po

Moderated by Mark Kramer, Program Director, Cold War Studies Program, Davis Center

In a remarkably short period of time in November 1989 -- less than two weeks -- the so-called Velvet Revolution (Sametová revoluce in Czech and Nežná revolúcia in Slovak) brought an end to Communist rule in Czechoslovakia.  Dramatic as the Velvet Revolution was, it came surprisingly late in a wave of upheavals that had been roiling East-Central Europe in 1989 -- upheavals that led to the demise of the Soviet bloc.  Three years after the Velvet Revolution, Czechoslovakia peacefully split into a Czech Republic and a Slovak Republic, and in subsequent years both of the new countries gained membership in NATO and the European Union.  This symposium will discuss the Velvet Revolution and the context in which it occurred in 1989, the consequences of the Velvet Revolution in the 1990s, and the legacy of the Velvet Revolution today in the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and the wider world.

Sponsored by the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies.

For more information, please call 617-495-4037.