Envisioning Opportunities for U.S.-Russia Cooperation in and with Central Asia

Friday, April 26, 2019 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
5 Central Asian flags hanging in building rotunda

The George Washington University | 1957 E Street Washington, DC 20052 | Room 505, Fifth Floor

Central Asia stands out as a comparatively “nontoxic” region where there are limited, but not insignificant, opportunities for U.S.-Russia collaboration both bilaterally and within multilateral frameworks: in the space industry, civil security, job-creation mechanisms and rural human capital, and knowledge sharing, for instance. Any proposal of U.S.-Russia cooperation in a concrete domain will have to be made in a tri- or multipartite way with the Central Asian state(s) concerned, under its/their supervision and leadership.

Please join us for the launch of the Working Group on the Future of U.S.-Russia Relations' latest expert paper, which contextualizes the bilateral relationship in Central Asia, points of friction, and potential areas for cooperation amid an extremely tense relationship between Washington and Moscow. 


Marlene Laruelle, Ph.D., is an Associate Director of and Research Professor at the Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (IERES), Elliott School of International Affairs, The George Washington University. Dr. Laruelle is also a Co-Director of the Program on New Approaches to Research and Security in Eurasia (PONARS) and Director of GWU’s Central Asia Program. 

Andrey Kortunov is Director General of the Russian International Council, an applied foreign policy research center in Moscow. Dr. Kortunov received his academic degrees from the Moscow State University of International Relations (MGIMO) and the Institute for U.S. and Canada Studies at the Soviet Academy of Sciences. He has served in a number of Russian and international think tanks and held positions in educational institutions in Russia and abroad.

Nargis Kassenova is Senior Fellow, Program on Central Asia, at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Harvard University, and Associate Professor at the Department of International Relations and Regional Studies, KIMEP University (Almaty, Kazakhstan).

RSVP requested; lunch will be served.


The Working Group on the Future of U.S.-Russia Relations convenes rising experts from leading American and Russian institutions to tackle the thorniest issues in the bilateral relationship. By engaging the latest generation of scholars in face-to-face discussion and debate, we aim to generate innovative analysis and policy recommendations that better reflect the common ground between the United States and Russia that is so often obscured by mistrust. We believe our unique, truly bilateral approach offers the best potential for breakthroughs in mutual understanding and reconciliation between our countries. The Working Group is a project of the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard University on the U.S. side, with generous support from Carnegie Corporation of New York. On the Russian side, the Working Group is sponsored by the National Research University-Higher School of Economics in Moscow.

PONARS Eurasia is an international network of scholars advancing new approaches to research on security, politics, economics, and society in Russia and Eurasia. The program is based at the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (IERES) at the George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs. PONARS Eurasia is supported in part by a grant from Carnegie Corporation of New York.

Speaker(s)

Marlene Laruelle, Associate Director of and Research Professor, Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (IERES), Elliott School of International Affairs, The George Washington University
Andrey Kortunov, Director General, Russian International Council
Discussant: Nargis Kassenova, Senior Fellow, Program on Central Asia, Davis Center

Co-sponsored by the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies and PONARS Eurasia.

For more information, please call 617-495-4037.